Springfield Free Speakers Series

History and the Bible: Evidence that Informs Our Understanding of Its Background, Transmission, Survival and Influence

In conjunction with the Passages exhibit, the Green Scholars Initiative is hosting an upcoming series of 23 internationally acclaimed authors and speakers in the fields of theology, archaeology and history. This is an incredibly popular series and previous lectures sold out immediately (DVDs of many of those sessions are available for sale).

Admission is FREE, but reservations are required and given on a first-come, first-served basis (limit 280 per event). Lectures begin promptly at 7 p.m. Reserve your tickets by calling the Box Office at 888-297-8011.

Date Speaker Lecture Title   Details
April 22, 2014 Dr. Tim Larsen A People of One Book A Bible-Saturated Century   Read More
June 17, 2014 Dr. Nick Perrin From Stories to Scriptures: When Did the Gospels Become Authoritative?   Read More
June 24, 2014 Dr. Robert Duke The Impact of the Bible on Jewish Literature of the Second Temple Period   Read More
July 22, 2014 Dr. Tim Laniak Joshua's Conquest: A Case Study in Biblical Archaeology   Read More
July 29, 2014 Dr. Mark Hall Christianity, the Bible, and the Founders of the American Republic   Read More
August 12, 2014 Dr. Tommy Wasserman Scribes and Scholars: The History and Practice of New Testament Textual Criticism   Read More
August 19, 2014 Dr. David Riggs Partakers of Heavenly Favor: How the Early Church Transformed the Graeco-Roman Concept of Grace   Read More
August 26, 2014 Dr. Michael Holmes From Scrolls to Scrolling: Scripture, Technology, and the Word of God   Read More
September 9, 2014 Dr. David Martinez Scripture and Epiphany in Early Christian Hymns on Papyri   Read More
September 16, 2013 Dr. Robert Cooley The Greatest Archaeological Discoveries and the New Testament   Read More
September 23, 2014 Dr. Peter Williams The Role of Names in Understanding Biblical Reliability   Read More
September 30, 2014 Dr. Karen Jobes The Septuagint and Its Role in Early Christianity   Read More
October 7, 2014 Dr. Adolfo Roitman The Isaiah Manuscripts from Qumran and Their Contribution to Biblical Studies. The Case Study of Is 19:18   Read More
October 14, 2014 Dr. David Hendin Insights on the Biblical Narrative from Judean and New Testament Coins   Read More
October 21, 2014 Dr. Brian Bernius; Dr. Elaine Bernius Sin City: The Archaeological Treasure Trove of Tel Dan   Read More
October 28, 2014 Dr. Marilyn Lundberg Visualizing the Bible: Using Sophisticated Technologies to Reclaim Biblical Texts   Read More
November 4, 2014 Dr. Christian Askeland Coptic Manuscripts and the Rise of Egyptian Christianity   Read More
November 11, 2014 Dr. Lawrence Schiffman The Bible and Its Interpretation in the Dead Sea Scrolls   Read More
November 18, 2014 Dr. Tommy Kidd George Whitefield: Lessons from the Eighteenth Century’s Greatest Evangelist   Read More
December 2, 2014 Dr. Bruce Zuckerman Reconstructing the Ancient Past: Using Digital Techniques to Reconstruct the Dead Sea Scrolls and Early New Testament Texts   Read More
December 9, 2014 Dr. Gordon Campbell The King James Bible: Its History Impact   Read More
December 16, 2014 Dr. Dirk Obbink; Dr.Jerry Pattengale Unveiling Cartonnage: -- CANCELLED -- Due to travel logistics  

Dr. Timothy Larsen Close Window
Timothy Larson A People of One Book A Bible-Saturated Century

Timothy Larsen is McManis Professor of Christian Thought, Wheaton College, Wheaton, Illinois. He is a historian and a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He has also been a Visiting Fellow, Trinity College, Cambridge University, and All Souls College, Oxford University. He is a contributing editor to Books & Culture, and his popular writings have appeared in magazines and journals such as World, Christianity Today, Christian Century, Faith and Leadership, and the Wall Street Journal. He is the editor of numerous books including The Cambridge Companion to Evangelical Theology, Bonhoeffer, Christ and Culture, Reading Romans through the Centuries, The Sermon on the Mount through the Centuries, and The Decalogue through the Centuries. He is the author of six books, the most recent of which, all published with Oxford University Press, are Crisis of Doubt: Honest Faith in Nineteenth-Century England, A People of One Book: The Bible and the Victorians, and The Slain God: Anthropologists and the Christian Faith.

Dr. Nick Perrin Close Window
Dr. Nick Perrin From Stories to Scriptures: When Did the Gospels Become Authoritative?
Nicholas Perrin (Ph.D., Marquette University) is Dean of the Wheaton Graduate School where he also holds the Franklin S. Dyrness Chair of Biblical Studies. Between 2000 and 2003, he was research assistant for N. T. Wright and has since authored and edited numerous articles and books, including Thomas and Tatian (Society of Biblical Literature/Brill); Thomas: The Other Gospel (Westminster John Knox); Lost in Transmission: What We Can Know about the Words of Jesus (Thomas Nelson); and Jesus the Temple (SPCK; Baker Academic), the first of a three-part trilogy on the historical Jesus. He is also co-editor of the recently revised edition of Dictionary of Jesus and the Gospels (InterVarsity).
Dr. Robert Duke Close Window
Dr. Robert Duke The Impact of the Bible on Jewish Literature of the Second Temple Period

Robert Duke, Associate Professor at Azusa Pacific University, was educated at Jerusalem University College and the University of California, Los Angeles (PhD, 2006). He is the author of The Social Location of the Visions of Amram (4Q543-547), (New York: Peter Lang, 2010) as well as several articles on Dead Sea Scrolls and Hebrew Bible topics. He has received funding for his studies and research from the Rotary Foundation as a Rotary Ambassadorial Scholar at Hebrew University and the Albright Institute of Archaeological Research.

Dr. Tim Laniak Close Window
Dr. Tim Laniak Joshua's Conquest: A Case Study in Biblical Archaeology

Dr. Tim Laniak serves at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary in Charlotte, North Carolina as the Dean, Professor of Old Testament, and Mentor for the Christian Leadership Doctor of Ministry Track. He received his bachelor’s degree from Wheaton College, his M.Div. from Gordon-Conwell Seminary, and his doctorate in Old Testament and Early Judaism from Harvard Divinity School. Dr. Laniak has published a book on social anthropology and the Bible (Shame and Honor in the Book of Esther, Scholars Press, 1997), the NIBC commentary on the book of Esther (Hendrickson Publishers, 2003), biblical theological resources on leadership (through Gordon Conwell’s Center for the Development of Evangelical Leadership), and A Handbook for Hebrew Exegesis. While serving as the Annual Professor at the Albright Institute for Archaeological Research in 2003-04, Dr. Laniak researched two books on shepherd leadership: Shepherds After My Own Heart: Pastoral Traditions in the Bible (InterVarsity Press, 2006) and While Shepherds Watch Their Flocks: Reflections on Leadership From the World of the Bible (ShepherdLeader Publications, 2007). He began the ministry of ShepherdLeader.com in 2007. His most recent book, Finding the Lost Images of God (Zondervan, 2012), explores seven biblical metaphors for God and His people.
After ordination in an independent evangelical church, Dr. Laniak and his wife Maureen began ministering cross-culturally, with short-term involvements together in over fifteen countries. They spent five years co-directing an international community of students and scholars in Boston with residents from over sixty nationalities. They also served an elderly immigrant community there for five years. Having lived in Israel for two years, Dr. Laniak frequentlyspeaks to groups about the historical and religious dynamics of the Middle East, and occasionally takes educational and experiential tours to the region.
Tim and his wife Maureen are actively involved in public education in Union County, North Carolina. They co-founded Life Long Learning, a non-profit company that offered non-traditional educational opportunities, and Union Academy, a charter school emphasizing character education and community service. They have three children, ages 18, 21 and 23, and live in Weddington, North Carolina.
Dr. Mark Hall Close Window
Dr. Mark Hall Christianity, the Bible, and the Founders of the American Republic

Mark David Hall is Herbert Hoover Distinguished Professor of Politics at George Fox University. He has written, edited, or co-edited The Political and Legal Philosophy of James Wilson, 1742-1798 (1997), The Founders on God and Government (2004); Collected Works of James Wilson (2007), The Forgotten Founders on Religion and Public Life (2009), The Sacred Rights of Conscience: Selected Readings on Religious Liberty and Church-State Relations in the American Founding (2009), America’s Forgotten Founders (2012), Roger Sherman and the Creation of the American Republic (2013), Faith and the Founders of the American Republic (2014), Collected Works of Roger Sherman (forthcoming), and more than fifty journal articles, book chapters, reviews, and sundry pieces. Mark is also Faculty Fellow in the William Penn Honors Program, Senior Fellow at Baylor University’s Institute for Studies of Religion, and President of Christians in Political Science.
Dr. Peter Flint Close Window
Dr. Peter Flint The Contents and Challenges of the Dead Sea Biblical Scrolls

Peter Flint serves as the Canada Research Chair in Dead Sea Scrolls Studies and actively promotes Scrolls studies through sponsored symposia, teaching, writing and delivering public lectures. He is the author of numerous studies on the Dead Sea Scrolls, including the critically acclaimed The Dead Sea Psalms Scrolls and the Book of Psalms (E. J. Brill), co-author of the widely-read Dead Sea Scrolls Bible (Harper San Francisco), and editor of the major two-volume collection The Dead Sea Scrolls after Fifty Years: A Comprehensive Assessment (E. J. Brill). Dr. Flint serves as a General Editor of one series on the Old Testament: The Formation and Interpretation of Old Testament Literature (E. J. Brill), as well as three series on the Dead Sea Scrolls. He has also edited over 25 Dead Sea Scrolls for three volumes in the internationally acclaimed series Discoveries in the Judaean Desert (Oxford University Press).
Dr. Tommy Wasserman Close Window
Dr. Tommy Wasserman Scribes and Scholars: The History and Practice of New Testament Textual Criticism

Tommy Wasserman (Ph.D., docent) is Associate Professor in New Testament Exegesis and Academic Dean at Örebro School of Theology. He wrote a PhD dissertation on the text and transmission of the Epistle of Jude published as The Epistle of Jude: Its Text and Transmission. Apart from a Swedish commentary on Hebrews, Wasserman has published numerous essays and articles in New Testament studies in top rank journals. He chaired the “Working with Biblical Manuscripts” program unit at the SBL International Meeting for many years and is currently chair of the text-critical seminar of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas. He is associate editor of TC: A Journal of Biblical Textual Criticism, and serves on the editorial board of New Testament Studies (Cambridge University Press).
Dr. David Riggs Close Window
Dr. David Riggs Partakers of Heavenly Favor: How the Early Church Transformed the Graeco-Roman Concept of Grace

David L. Riggs (B.A., Azusa Pacific University; M.Div., Princeton Theological Seminary; M.Phil., D.Phil., Oxford University [Faculty of Classics]) is an associate professor of humanities and executive director of the John Wesley Honors College. Riggs’ scholarly interests revolve around both his primary research agenda devoted to the religious world of late antiquity and his participation in various national dialogues on spirituality and liberal learning in American higher education. Most of his research publications have focused on the socio-religious history of late-antique North Africa and he is preparing a manuscript on pagan and Christian cultic life in late Roman and Vandal Africa for Oxford University Press (Divine Patronage in Late Antique North Africa). Riggs is also engaged in a long-term collaborative research project (with Christopher Bounds and students and alumni from the John Wesley Honors College) exploring patristic conceptions of “grace” in light of Graeco-Roman models of patronage. In addition, Riggs serves as a distinguished scholar of Latin texts for the Green Scholars Initiative and recently edited and translated an unpublished Latin letter of Martin Luther for the Green Collection. In his capacity as an honors educator, Riggs is co-editing (with Stan Rosenberg) a monograph for the National Collegiate Honors Council entitled Seeking the Soul of Excellence: Spirituality and Holistic Learning in Honors Education.
Dr. Michael Holmes Close Window
Dr. Michael Holmes From Scrolls to Scrolling: Scripture, Technology, and the Word of God

Michael Holmes is University Professor of Biblical Studies and Early Christianity at Bethel University, where he has taught since 1982. He has also taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School and Princeton Theological Seminary, and was Chair of the Department of Biblical and Theological Studies from 2001 to 2009. A member of the Studiorum Novi Testamenti Societas, the Institute for Biblical Research, the Society of Biblical Literature, and the North American Patristics Society, he serves on the Executive Committee of the International Greek New Testament Project, the Editorial Board for New Testament Studies, and the Board of Directors of the Center for the Study of NT Manuscripts (www.csntm.org). Primary research interests include the text and transmission of the New Testament, the formation of the Biblical canon, and the Apostolic Fathers (a collection of early Christian writings). His publications include more than fifty articles or essays and eleven books, among them The Apostolic Fathers: Greek Texts and English Translations (3rd ed., 2007); The Greek New Testament: SBL Edition (2010); with Klaus Wachtel, The Textual History of the Greek New Testament: Changing Views in Contemporary Research (2011), and the NIV Application Commentary: 1 and 2 Thessalonians.
Dr. David Martinez Close Window
Dr. David Martinez Scripture and Epiphany in Early Christian Hymns on Papyri

David Martinez (Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1985) is Associate Professor in the Department of Classics, the Divinity School at the University of Chicago. He is the author of P. Michigan XVI: A Greek Love Charm from Egypt and Baptized for our Sakes: A Leather Trisagion from Egypt. He has also written articles on documentary Greek papyri and ancient Greek religion and magic. His current projects include the publication of the Texas papyri and projects which relate papyrological research to the study of early Christianity. His teaching interests focus on Greek papyrology and paleography, Greek language, Hellenistic authors, and early Christian literature.
Dr. Robert Cooley Close Window
Dr. Robert Cooley The Greatest Archaeological Discoveries and the New Testament

Robert E. Cooley is President Emeritus of Gordon-Conwell Seminary, and remains active in its Charlotte campus. Recognized widely for his research and writing in the field of archaeology, Dr. Cooley has overseen a number of excavation projects in the USA, and during the past fifty years he has directed excavations at locations such as Tell Dothan, Khirbet Haiyan, et'Tell, and Khirbet Raddana (Ramallah) in Palestine, and at Tell er-Retaba in Egypt. He has served as the principal investigator related to these excavations for over 100 monographs published by the Missouri State University Center for Archaeological Research. In addition to his excavation activities, Dr. Cooley has directed more than 70 study trips throughout the Middle East. As a working scholar, he has been active in a variety of professional societies, in numerous public, community and state civic activities, and served Christianity Today as a Senior Editor. Dr. Cooley is the past president of The Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada; and, has served on boards of trustees at European and American institutions. He serves on the Board of Directors for the Museum of the Bible, which upon its completion will house much of the Green Collection.
Dr. Peter Williams Close Window
Dr. Peter Williams The Role of Names in Understanding Biblical Reliability

Peter (P.J.) Williams (b. 1970) is the Warden (CEO) of Tyndale House, Cambridge, UK, a world-leading evangelical center for biblical research. He was educated at Cambridge University, where he received his MA, MPhil and PhD, in the study of ancient languages related to the Bible. After his PhD he taught Hebrew and Old Testament at Cambridge University while he was a Research Fellow in Old Testament at Tyndale House (1998–2003). From 2003 to 2007 he was on the faculty of the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, where he became a Senior Lecturer in New Testament. In July 2007 he became Warden of Tyndale House. He is also a member of the Translation Oversight Committee of the English Standard Version of the Bible, chairman of the International Greek New Testament Project, honorary Senior Lecturer in Biblical Studies at the University of Aberdeen, and Affiliated Lecturer in the University of Cambridge. He is married to Kathryn with two children, Magdalena (2001) ansd Leo (2005).
Dr. Karen Jobes Close Window
Dr. Karen Jobes The Septuagint and Its Role in Early Christianity

Dr. Karen H. Jobes is the Gerald F. Hawthorne Professor of New Testament Greek and Exegesis at Wheaton College, teaching in both the undergraduate Ancient Language program and the Masters Biblical Exegesis program. Before coming to Wheaton she was an Associate Professor of New Testament at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, CA, where she was the recipient of the 2000-2001 Westmont Faculty Research Award. She has also taught at Westminster Theological Seminary, Eastern College, the Center for Urban Theological Studies, and Regent College.
Jobes holds a Ph.D. in biblical hermeneutics from Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, an M.S. in Computer Science from Rutgers University Graduate School, and she did her undergraduate work in physics at the College of New Jersey (formerly Trenton State College).
Her latest book, an exegetical commentary on 1, 2, & 3 John was released in February 2014 in Zondervan’s Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament (ZECNT). Letters to the Church: A Survey of Hebrews and the General Epistles appeared with Zondervan in October 2011. She is also the author of 1 Peter in Baker’s Exegetical Commentary of the New Testament (BECNT) series (2005). Her other books are Invitation to the Septuagint (with Moisés Silva; Baker Academic, 2000), The NIV Application Commentary: Esther (Zondervan, 1999), and The Alpha-Text of Esther: Its Character and Relationship to the Masoretic Text (Scholars Press, 1996). She was the general editor of the Bringing the Bible to Life small group series (Zondervan, 2008–2010).
For nearly twenty years Dr. Jobes has been a member of the Committee on Bible Translation that produced and oversees the NIV (New International Version), a translator for the New English Translation of the Septuagint (NETS), and translated a manuscript of Esther for the British Library’s Codex Sinaiticus project. She has served on the editorial board of the Bulletin for Biblical Research and on the board of the Center for the Study of New Testament Manuscripts. She also serves on the executive committee of the International Organization for Septuagint and Cognate Studies (IOSCS) and is a former Program Chair for the Greek Bible unit in the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL), of which she is a member. She is also a member of the Evangelical Theological Society (ETS) and the Institute for Biblical Research (IBR).
She and her husband, Forrest, live in Glen Ellyn, Illinois and are members of Immanuel Presbyterian Church (Evangelical Presbyterian Church).
Dr. Adolfo Roitman Close Window
Dr. Adolfo Roitman The Isaiah Manuscripts from Qumran and Their Contribution to Biblical Studies. The Case Study of Is 19:18

Born in Buenos Aires, Argentine, in 1957. M. A. in Anthropological Studies (University of Buenos Aires, cum laude, 1980). M. A. in Comparative Religions (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, cum laude, 1985). Ph.D. in Ancient Jewish Literature and Religion (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, 1993). He holds a Doctorate Honoris Causa from Rocky Mountain College, Montana, USA. Since 1994, he is the Lizbeth and George Krupp Curator of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Head of the Shrine of the Book at the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.
He is the author of numerous books and articles about the Dead Sea Scrolls and Ancient Judaism including: A Day at Qumran: The Dead Sea Sect and Its Scrolls (Jerusalem: The Israel Museum, 1997); The Sectarians from Qumran: Daily Life of the Essenes (Barcelona: Ediciones Martínez Roca, 2000, in Spanish); Envisioning the Temple. Scrolls, Stones and Symbols (Jerusalem: The Israel Museum, 2003). His latest book: Bible, Exegesis and Religion. A Critical-Historical Reading of Judaism (Navarra, 2010, in Spanish).
Dr. Roitman lectures widely on early Jewish literature, the history and significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls and biblical interpretation. He has also served as a visiting scholar at universities across the United States, Central and South America, and Europe.
Dr. David Hendin Close Window
Dr. David Hendin Insights on the Biblical Narrative from Judean and New Testament Coins

David Hendin is adjunct curator at the American Numismatic Society, New York. He is a specialist in weights and currency of the ancient Levant, especially Judaean and biblical, Roman provincial, and Nabataean numismatics. He is author of Guide to Biblical Coins (2010), now in its fifth edition, Ancient Scale Weights and Pre-Coinage Currency of the Near East (2007) and 10 other books, as well as 30 articles in scholarly journals. Hendin has lectured in England and Italy, throughout Israel and the United States, and at Goteborg University, Sweden where he was the 2013 recipient of the Gunnar Holst Numismatic Medal for his work. Hendin is one of the few numismatists who has done archaeological fieldwork, three seasons at Sepphoris in the Galilee under the auspices of Duke University (Eric & Carol Meyers) and Hebrew University (Ehud Netzer). Hendin’s other careers as journalist , publishing executive, and literary agent began in 1970 and continue to the present.
Dr. Brian Bernius; Dr. Elaine Bernius Close Window
Dr. Brian Bernius Sin City: The Archaeological Treasure Trove of Tel Dan

Brian Bernius (Ph.D. Hebrew Union College-JIR) is an Associate Professor of Religion at Indiana Wesleyan University (2005) and an ordained elder in the Church of the Nazarene. He is the author and director of IWU’s Summer in Israel Program, a contributing author to the Archaeological Study Bible, and has written numerous articles and Bible studies for church-related curriculum. Brian has been part of multiple archaeological digs including those at the sites of Dan, Megiddo, and Rehov in Israel.



Dr Elaine Bernius Elaine Bernius (Ph.D., Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion) is an Associate Professor of Biblical Studies at Indiana Wesleyan University and an ordained minister in the Church of the Nazarene. She is currently serving as a research scholar supervising student researchers for the Green Scholars Initiative’s Dead Sea Scrolls volume. Elaine’s additional research interests include topics in Bible (from the book of Esther to the distinction of dialects within the biblical corpus) and the development of innovative teaching strategies with a particular focus on enhancing long-term student accessibility to use of biblical languages.


Dr. Marilyn Lundberg Close Window
Dr. Marilyn Lundberg Visualizing the Bible: Using Sophisticated Technologies to Reclaim Biblical Texts

Dr. Marilyn Lundberg is Associate Director of West Semitic Research and the West Semitic Research Project of the University of Southern California, and Associate Director for Ingest/Cataloguing of the InscriptiFact Project. She is Adjunct Associate Professor at Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California. She received her Master of Divinity from Fuller Theological Seminary and her Ph.D. from Claremont Graduate University in Religion (Old Testament). Dr. Lundberg has participated in the preparation of a number of exhibitions and presentations for the general public, including “Digital Technology and the Dead Sea Scrolls” an electronic demonstration program she wrote on CD-ROM for the De Young Museum (San Francisco) as part of its exhibition of the Dead Sea Scrolls. She is co-editor of The Dead Sea Scrolls Catalogue published by Scholars Press in 1994, with Bruce Zuckerman, Associate Editor of The Leningrad Codex: A Facsimile Edition, and with Steven Fine and Wayne T. Pitard, co-editor of Puzzling out the Past: Studies in the Northwest Semitic Languages and Literature in Honor of Bruce Zuckerman.
Dr. Christian Askeland Close Window
Dr. Christian Askeland Coptic Manuscripts and the Rise of Egyptian Christianity

Christian Askeland serves as assistant research professor of Christian Origins at Indiana Wesleyan University, and also as central region director and distinguished scholar of Coptic manuscripts with the Green Scholars Initiative. His book John’s gospel: the Coptic translations of its Greek text (de Gruyter, 2012) won the International Association of Coptic Studies 2012 award for excellence. He is currently completing a critical edition of the Sahidic Coptic text of the Revelation of John for a German Research Fund project at the Protestant University of Wuppertal (Germany). Christian’s research broadly engages the task of reconstructing the earliest attainable text of the Greek New Testament, especially considering the use of early translations and the novel employment of digital publishing. He has also participated in the European Research Council sponsored NEWCONT project, reconsidering the Nag Hammadi Library within the context of fourth and fifth century monasticism.
Dr. Lawrence Schiffman Close Window
Dr. Lawrence Schiffman The Bible and Its Interpretation in the Dead Sea Scrolls

Lawrence H. Schiffman serves as Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education and Professor of Judaic Studies at Yeshiva University. He is Edelman Professor Emeritus of Hebrew and Judaic Studies and former Chair of the Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University where he taught for 39 years.
He received his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the Department of Near Eastern and Judaic Studies at Brandeis University. At the same time he studied at the Machzike Torah Institute of the Bostoner Rebbe and with Rabbi Joseph Soloveichik. He is a specialist in the Dead Sea Scrolls, Judaism in Late Antiquity, the history of Jewish law, and Talmudic literature.
Together with a colleague, he served as editor-in-chief of the Oxford Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls (2000) and for ten years as one of the editors of the journal Dead Sea Discoveries and has authored more than 200 articles on the Dead Sea Scrolls and Rabbinic Judaism. In 2006 he was the recipient of the National Foundation for Jewish Culture Scholarship Award.
His most recent books are The Courtyards of the House of the Lord: Studies on the Temple Scroll (Brill, 2008) and Qumran and Jerusalem: Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls and the History of Judaism (Eerdmans Publishing, 2010) He also recorded two audio lecture series for Recorded Books, The Dead Sea Scrolls: The Truth Behind the Mystique and The Hebrew Bible and has been featured in many TV documentaries on PBS and BBC. With two colleagues he recently edited the 3300 page, 3 volume Outside the Bible: Ancient Jewish Writings Related to Scripture (JPS, 2014).
He was the director of New York University’s program at the archaeological excavations at Dor, Israel, from 1980-82. He has been a visiting professor at Yale University, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Duke University, the University of Toronto, the Johns Hopkins University, the Russian State University for the Humanities (Moscow), the University of Hartford, Queens College, Pontifical Gregorian University (Rome), Yeshiva University, and the University of Vienna.
Dr. Schiffman is immediate past chair and Representative of the Orthodox Union for the International Jewish Committee on Interreligious Consultation (IJCIC), the Jewish liaison to the Vatican and other religious groups. A contributing editor of the Long Island Jewish World newspaper, Dr. Schiffman has lectured widely in universities, academic conferences, and for Jewish community organizations.
Dr. Tommy Kidd Close Window
Dr. Tommy Kidd George Whitefield: Lessons from the Eighteenth Century’s Greatest Evangelist

Thomas Kidd is Professor of History at Baylor University and is Senior Fellow at Baylor’s Institute for Studies of Religion. His books include Patrick Henry: First Among Patriots, published in 2011 by Basic Books, and God of Liberty: A Religious History of the American Revolution, published in 2010, also with Basic Books. Other books include American Christians and Islam, published in 2008 by Princeton University Press, The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America, published by Yale University Press (2007), and The Great Awakening: A Brief History with Documents, with Bedford Books (2007). He earned his Ph.D. in history at the University of Notre Dame, where he studied under George Marsden. He is currently writing a biography of George Whitefield, due out in fall 2014 with Yale University Press, and is also writing (with Barry Hankins) a history of Baptists in America. Kidd contributes regularly to outlets including WORLD magazine, The Gospel Coalition, and Patheos.com, where he coordinates the Anxious Bench blog.
Dr. Bruce Zuckerman Close Window
Dr. Bruce Zuckerman Reconstructing the Ancient Past: Using Digital Techniques to Reconstruct the Dead Sea Scrolls and Early New Testament Texts

Dr. Bruce Zuckerman is Director of the Casden Institute for the Study of the Jewish Role in American Life; Professor of Hebrew Bible in the School of Religion at the University of Southern California, where he teaches courses in the Hebrew Bible, the Bible in Western Literature, the Ancient Near East, and Archaeology. He received his Ph.D. in ancient Near Eastern Languages from Yale University and is a specialist in Northwest Semitic languages. Besides his teaching responsibilities, he directs the West Semitic Research and InscriptiFact Projects and the USC Archaeological Research Collection. He specializes in photographing ancient texts including numerous projects involving the Dead Sea Scrolls. His book, Job the Silent: A Study in Biblical Counterpoint, was published in 1991 by Oxford University Press and The Leningrad Codex: A Facsimile Edition, for which he and his brother Kenneth did the principal photography, was published in 1998. He is co-author of a collection of essays, Double Takes, published in 2005. He has published numerous research articles on ancient texts from biblical times and his photographs have been featured in many scholarly publications as well as in a number of popular venues.
Dr. Gordon Campbell Close Window
Dr. Gordon Campbell The and King James Bible: Its History Impact Gordon Campbell is Professor of Renaissance Studies at the University of Leicester, England; author of numerous books on John Milton; most recently a full-length biography of Milton (2008); a 12-volume edition of Milton’s works (2008-2010); a history of the King James Bible<, The Bible: The Story of the King James Version, 1611-2011 (2011), and an edition of the 1611 KJV Bible (2011), all with Oxford University Press. Dr. Campbell keeps an active international speaking schedule, and also has decades of research and interaction with Islamic texts and cultures. He serves as Senior Scholar for the Green Scholars Initiative, KJV Project.
Dr. Dirk Obbink and Jerry Pattengale Close Window
Dr. Dirk Obbink and Jerry Pattengale Unveiling Cartonnage: The Practice and Value of Dissolving Reused Papyri Manuscripts for Biblical Studies

Dirk Obbink is the Lecturer in Papyrology and Greek Literature in the Faculty of Classics at Oxford University and is the head of the prestigious Oxyrhynchus Papyri Project. Obbink has achieved the rare distinction of a dual appointment as an American University Professor (Collegiate Professor of Papyrology, University of Michigan) and Fellow and Tutor in the University of Oxford (Christ Church). He is also Director of the Imaging Papyri Project at Oxford. This project is working to capture digitized images of Greek and Latin papyri held by the Ashmolean Museum (the Oxyrhynchus Papyri), and the Bodleian Library and the Biblioteca Nazionale in Naples (the carbonized scrolls from the Villa of the Papyri at Herculaneum), for the creation of an Oxford bank of digitized images of papyri. In addition to several books and many scholarly articles, he has led the publication of nearly 80 volumes on the Oxyrynchus texts. Dr. Obbink serves as Senior Scholar for the Green Scholars Initiative for both the Papyri and Climaci Rescriptus Projects